Wi-Fi 6 is coming to a router near you

The Wi-Fi alliance has changed the naming scheme for Wi-Fi standards, abandoning the 802.11 designations for simpler names like Wi-Fi 6, Wi-Fi 5, Wi-Fi 4, etc., but that may gloss over some of the finer points of the old IEEE system.

Source: Jon Gold, Senior Writer, Network World

Just when we were all getting used to the IEEE 802.11 Wi-Fi nomenclature that differentiates between generations of the technology, the industry’s Wi-Fi Alliance has gone and made it simpler and more digestible for the user on the street.

As a result, starting this month what we know as 802.11ax is officially called Wi-Fi 6.

The new, vastly simplified system also means that 802.11ac is now Wi-Fi 5, and 802.11n is Wi-Fi 4. The idea, according to the Wi-Fi Alliance, is to make matching endpoint and router capabilities a simpler matter for the rank-and-file user of Wi-Fi technology.

Think of it as the unlicensed equivalent to the various Gs – 3G, 4G, 5G – that the cellular data carriers have rolled out over the years – broad descriptors of the generation of connectivity tech that it’s in place on a given device, not specific technical specifications.

What is Wi-Fi 6 good for?

The basic technology behind Wi-Fi 6, which is still known as 802.11ax on the technical side, promises major advances beyond just higher data rates, including better performance in dense radio environments and higher power efficiency.

Wi-Fi 6 is also seen as a possible communications method for internet-of-things (IoT) devices that have low power capabilities and limited battery life. Thanks to a feature called target wake time, Wi-Fi 6 IoT devices can shut down their Wi-Fi connections most of the time and connect only briefly as scheduled in order to transmit data they’ve gathered since the last time, thus extending battery life.

Farpoint Group principal and Network World contributor Craig Mathias said that, given the degree to which consumerization is the driving force even behind enterprise IT these days, the re-naming is probably a step in the right direction, but that doesn’t mean that simply labeling 802.11ax as Wi-Fi 6 tells the whole story.

“Saying, for example, that a given product is ‘Wi-Fi 6’ just specifies which generation it belongs to, and very little else,” he said. “By analogy, one can purchase a 2019 Ford Edge. But there are also SE, SEL, Titanium, and ST models, and numerous options for each of these trim levels. So saying one has a Ford Edge isn’t really very descriptive at all.”

A bigger potential issue, Mathias added, is that presenting different Wi-Fi technologies via a simple sequential naming convention can mislead users. 802.11ad and ay are 60GHz standards, with vastly different characteristics and capabilities than 2.4GHz and 5GHz systems. Simply calling them “Wi-Fi 7” makes them sound like the next generation of the same technology, not something that’s fundamentally designed to accomplish different tasks.

“A number of potential issues arise if linear numbering is taken to imply ‘better,’” he said.

The Wi-Fi Alliance says that vendors will be able to incorporate the new naming scheme in their user interfaces. So as mobile users move from access point to access point, their screens will use the new numbering system show the standard that was used to establish the current connection.

The new terminology will also be applied to the Wi-Fi Alliance’s certification program for wireless products. So, for example, starting next year if a product meets the 802.11ax standard it will receive a Wi-Fi CERTIFIED 6 designation.


SRS Industrial Media Converters for Electric Utility Substations & HazLoc Environments

The network equipment used in electric utility substations, and environments classified as HazLoc, are subject to tight regulations, numerous certifications and approvals. When it comes to integrating the copper and fibre cabling found in these highly distributed networks, a properly designed and certified Industrial Media Converter is required. To meet this need, the new Perle SRS Industrial Media Converters include:

  • IEC 61850-3 and IEEE 1613 electric utility substation certification
  • Numerous hazardous industrial location (HazLoc) certifications, including ATEX Class 1 Zone 2 and ANSI/ISA 12.12.01 Class 1 Division 2
  • DIN Rail enclosure with Triple Power Input,
  • Operating temperature support of -40C to +75C
  • An on-board microcontroller which deals with error detection and recovery by continuously monitoring the status of the links connected to its transceiver ports

Perle SRS Industrial Media Converters include 15 models compatible with 10/100/1000Base-T Ethernet and SFP, dual fibre ST/SC or single fibre SC/ST connectors.

For further details, follow this link: https://www.perle.com/products/industrial-temperature-media-converters.shtml

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SR Industrial DIN Rail Media Converters

Data communication networks in  industrial environments are subject to extreme temperatures, vibrations, electromagnetic interference (EMI) and other potentially disturbing noises. The Industrial Network Engineer has to layer that with the additional challenge of connecting distributed switches and equipment located throughout an industrial plant floor to ensure data does not to become corrupted during transmission

John Feeney, COO at Perle Systems comments, “Because most industrial networks are a hybrid of copper and fibre cabling, these obstacles can be overcome with the inclusion of Copper to fibre Media Converters. Perle’s new SR Media Converters have features specifically designed to meet the unique needs found in these environments.”

  • The compact chassis easily mounts on a DIN rail or inside distribution boxes.
  • Triple redundant power input can be supplied using two redundant terminal blocks or through the optional TBUS DIN Rail Bus connector system that transmits voltage across the bus.
  • With operating temperature support of -40C to +75C, these media converters are ideal for use with industrial devices subjected to harsh environments and severe temperatures such as security cameras, wireless access points, alarms, traffic controllers, sensors and tracking devices.
  • All Perle Media Converters have an on-board microcontroller which deals with error detection and recovery by continuously monitoring the status of the links connected to its transceiver ports.

Perle SR Industrial Media Converters include 98 models compatible with 10/100/1000Base-T Ethernet and SFP, dual fibre ST/SC or single fibre SC/ST connectors.

Find out more [https://www.perle.com/products/media-converters/din-rail-media-converters.shtml]

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‘Hologram’ lecturers to teach students at Imperial College London

By Leo Kelion, Technology desk editor
BBC News: 01 November 2018

University classes are set to be given a futuristic spin by letting lecturers appear as hologram-like apparitions beamed in from afar.

Imperial College - Hologram
Imperial College London will show off the technology at a special event later on Thursday before deploying it more widely.

It believes it will be the first academic body to do so regularly.

A similar effect has been used to animate images of Michael Jackson, Elvis Presley and other celebrities.

Imperial will initially limit its use to its Business School’s activities but expects the technology could eventually become common.

“The alternative is to use video-conferencing software but we believe these holograms have a much greater sense of presence,” Dr David Lefevre, director of Imperial’s Edtech Lab, told the BBC.

To read more, follow the link below…

Source: https://www.bbc.com/news/technology-46060381

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What is AGX Xavier?

The NVIDIA® Jetson™ AGX Xavier™ is the world’s first AI computer for autonomous machines.

Xavier-TX2i-1024x476

  • 20x performance than Jetson™ TX2
  • 512-core Volta GPU and 64 Tensor cores with discreet dual Deep Learning Accelerator (DLA) NVDLA engines
  • 4 x dual-core CPU clusters (8 NVIDIA Carmel processor cores)
  • 16GB 256-bit wide LPDDR4X memory interface
  • Module Size: 100 mm x 87 mm

 

For further specifications, please refer to the documentation available for Jetson AGX Xavier in the Jetson Download Center.

What is the difference between TX2 and AGX Xavier?

Feature Jetson™ TX2 Jetson™ AGX Xavier
GPU 256 Core Pascal @ 1.3GHz 512 Core Volta @ 1.37GHz
64 Tensor Cores
DL Accelerator (2x) NVDLA
Vision Accelerator (2x) 7-way VLIW Processor
CPU 6 core Denver and A57 @ 2GHz
(2x) 2MB L2
8 core Carmel ARM CPU @ 2.26GHz
(4x) 2MB L2 + 4MB L3
Memory 8GB 128 bit LPDDR4
58.4 GB/s
16GB 256-bit LPDDR4x @ 2133MHz
137 GB/s
Storage 32GB eMMC 32GB eMMC
Video Encode (2x) 4K @30
HEVC
(4x) 4Kp60 / (8x) 4Kp30
HEVC
Video Decode (2x) 4K @30
12 bit support
(2x) 8Kp30 / (6x) 4Kp60
12 bit support
Camera 12 lanes MIPI CSI-2
D-PHY 1.2 30Gbps
16 lanes MIPI CSI-2 | 8 lanes SLVS-EC
D-PHY 40Gbps / C-PHY 109Gbps
PCI Express 5 lanes PCIe Gen 2
1×4 + 1×1 | 2×1 + 1×4
16 lanes PCIe Gen 4
1×8 + 1×4 + 1×2 + 2×1
Mechanical 50mm x 87mm
400 pin connector
100mm x 87mm
699 pin connector
Power 7.5W / 15W 10W / 15W / 30W

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